Careers in Biology

The study of biology is a highly multi-faceted and subdivided discipline, with specializations ranging from molecular and cellular biology to botany and physiology.  Choosing the study of biology as an undergraduate or graduate student can offer many different potential career paths and areas of focus. Almost 150,000 biology degrees were awarded in the US in 2016, and that total is expected to grow by more than 3% per year.  This is good, as job prospects in biology and related fields are expected to grow by about 4% over the next several years. There are about 2.5 million people with biology degrees currently in the workforce, with an average wage of $102,000. (DataUSA) The most common occupations for biology majors are in the medical or educational fields, but there are many other professions that a person interested in the biological sciences might choose. All careers in biology require high reading comprehension, writing and active listening skills, as well as analytic and decision making skills. 

Below are links to places where one can find information about possible careers in specific fields of biology. This list is not comprehensive, but a tool to help students start to think about careers in biology.  Many careers in biology do not require a master's or higher degree. Appstate's Career Development Center can help with career counseling, resume building and internships, and our faculty welcomes your inquiries about particular career paths as well.